If you’re on a shared hosting plan and have cPanel, login to cPanel and select phpMyAdmin found under Databases.

Once you’re inside phpMyAdmin, select the database that you’re using for your WordPress installation. In this case, we will use xxxxx_WWLdb (the prefix is blocked out).

Look for a table entry called wp_users and select it (hover and click on wp_users). In most scenarios this should be the case. However, if you’re a security enthusiast, then you might have used a different prefix during the WordPress installation. The default prefix is wp_ hence the table entry wp_users. However, if your prefix was say notwp_ then your user table entry would be notwp_users.

For simplicity, let’s assume the default prefix – wp_users. Once the table is loaded, look for the username you had chosen while installing WordPress. In this tutorial I’m assuming it’s the default username – admin. Click on the little yellow pencil icon located next to the admin entry – that’s the edit icon.

Look for the row named user_pass (usually the 3rd one). The password is shown as encrypted.

You may also change other values, such as user_login and user_email, if desired.

  • Under the Function field, set it to MD5.
  • Under the Value field, enter your new password – let’s say changed-password.
  • Click on Save Changes (select Save and click GO).

Done!

FYI – when you refresh the page, your new password will be encrypted.